"ELVIS" 68 Comeback TV Special To Hit Movie Theaters (Updated)

 If you live in the Lehigh Valley area local club members will gather for a dinner and attend the Elvis TV Special movie night on Monday, August 20th at the Center Valley 16 Theater.  Please contact the club if you would like to attend this local event.

If you live in the Lehigh Valley area local club members will gather for a dinner and attend the Elvis TV Special movie night on Monday, August 20th at the Center Valley 16 Theater.  Please contact the club if you would like to attend this local event.

Elvis Presley's legendary television special Elvis, better known as the "'68 Comeback Special," will be screened in movie theaters this summer to mark the 50th anniversary of its airing. The screenings will take place on Presley's death, August 16th, and again on August 20th. 

The owner of Elvis Presley Enterprises, Authentic Brands Group–which also owns and manages branding for Marilyn Monroe and Shaquille O'Neal, among others–is arranging the screening with Fathom Events. They have yet to announce the screening times.

"Seeing Elvis onscreen is one of the most memorable and influential brand experiences and we look forward to bringing this special and future events to audiences around the world," ABG's senior vice president of entertainment, Marc Rosen, said in a statement.

"ABG is recognized as a global leader in the brand space and the company's commitment to creating immersive brand experiences aligns perfectly with Fathom's dedication to providing our audiences with exclusive, interactive and memorable cinema events," Fathom Events CEO Ray Nutt said. "We look forward to working together on many exciting projects for cinema audiences worldwide, beginning with this rare concert experience for Elvis fans."

Presley's comeback special came at a time when the King had been appearing in movies rather than recording music or performing live. It opened with footage of him dressed in a slick, black leather jumpsuit–curling his lip the way his fans remembered–and included a loose, "sit-down" set where he played his early hits with members from his backing band in the Fifties.

"Elvis was hardly ever nervous–but he was then," drummer D.J. Fontana told Rolling Stone in a feature about the special last year. "We played a couple of songs, and it got loose after a while, and it turned out fine. He just had been out of the public eye for a long time."

 

Source: Rolling Stone